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Grilling Tips & Tricks (Infographic)

Jul 25, 2018 8:30:00 AM

GrillingTips-Full

An essential part of summer means taking advantage of the longer days by relaxing outside, enjoying the warm temperatures, and of course, using the grill for summertime entertaining. Whether you have a gas grill, charcoal grill, or smoker, an outdoor barbecue seems like the perfect way to gather friends and family to enjoy an outdoor meal.

Whether it’s an all day laid-back barbecue or a hot and fast grilling for dinner, there are certain methods and guidelines that can avert food poisoning, cross-contamination, or risk of bacteria when using the grill.

Did you know there are certain minimum cooking temperatures for each type of meat or seafood being cooked? For example, while pork has a minimum cooking temperature of 145 °F, chicken has a higher minimum temperature of 165 °F. Using proper cooking temperatures and understanding the differences will ensure safe food practices.

Knowing the risks and taking the preventative steps to reduce them is the secret to a successful grilling experience. Remember, it’s not only what you do while you’re cooking on the grill, but how you prep the food, serve, and store it as well.

Below is an informational graphic MadgeTech has created in order educate those on the importance of staying safe while grilling. Feeling unsure or not quite positive when it comes to certain cooking temperatures or proper grilling guidelines? MadgeTech is here to help!

 

Grilling at a Glance

 


Posted by Nina Vernali
“Nina

Nina joined MadgeTech in May of 2018 as a Marketing Content Writer who specializes in market research and analysis, product marketing, and creative strategy. Nina has written press releases and case studies that were featured in magazines, newspapers, and several websites. Nina graduated from Southern New Hampshire University where she received her Master of Science in Business Management with a concentration in Marketing. Outside of the office, Nina enjoys cooking, crafting, and photography.

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